Diego Rivera Prints

Diego Rivera Prints


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Nino con Cesto
Nino con Cesto




Pareja Indigena
Pareja Indigena




Flower Vendor with Child
Flower Vendor with Child

Influences


Often times, artists are inspired by something or someone which goes on to shape their future endeavors. The same can be said for Diego Rivera, who was inspired by several people at an early age.

While attending San Carlos Academy as a full-time student, Rivera would often stop by a little shop nearby. The owner, Jose Posada, was Rivera’s first influence. Many famous Mexican artists of the 19th Century were teachers at San Carlos; however, Rivera maintained that he learned about the art of his own country from Posada. Posada owned a small printing shop and Rivera would habitually stop by and watch him work on his prints and drawings. Rivera admired his work immensely and went on to say that his paintings were so full of life and energy that they might jump off the page at any moment.

Rivera’s other major influences would come in 1907, when he moved to Spain to study with Spanish painter Chicharro for two years and spent the next fourteen years of his life in Europe. He encountered the works of such artists as Cezanne, Gauguin, Renoir, and Matisse. Rivera was looking for a new style of painting that could express the intricacies of every-day-life yet still reach a wide audience. A lifelong friendship with Elie Faure prompted him to go to Italy to study the masters.

It was in Italy that he discovered his medium, frescoes, which are mural paintings done on fresh plaster. The unique aspect of frescoes is that the paint is applied directly on a wet mixture of sand and lime in order to help the color penetrate and adhere when the mixture dried.

While he found himself caught up in his search for mew truths, he felt cubism was too intellectual. He said it was more concerned with technical skill rather than the natural fluidity of design. And although this was the reason cubism gradually disappeared from his work, he still maintained some techniques of the art in his later works.

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