Diego Rivera Prints

Diego Rivera Prints


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La Noche de Los Pobres
La Noche de Los Pobres






Muchacha Con Girasoles
Muchacha Con Girasoles






Naturaleza Muerta
Naturaleza Muerta

Communist Connection


Diego Rivera was considered a social realist in life, a form of naturalistic realism focusing on social problems and hardships of everyday life. This may be why Rivera felt such a connection to the Communist movement in Russia and the plight of the working class.

Rivera’s interest in Russian matters started at an early age. While his father was a liberal, anticlerical man, and his two aunts were very religious, Diego was interested in military issues, especially those of the Russian army and the conflict it was facing; the Tsar and the Orthodox Church versus Marxist Revolutionaries.

In the same year that he helped establish the Revolutionary Union of Technical Workers, Painters, and Sculptors in 1922, he also joined the Mexican Communist Party. In his mural The Agitator, you can see that Rivera was very much engaged by the Soviet Revolution, as his signature is marked by the Soviet hammer and sickle.

His interest in communism was further developed during his time in Europe where he met his first wife, Russian Angelina Beloff. Although he did not know Lenin first-hand, he had a fascination with the fight for the freedom of Russian workers.

Communism continued to be a major source of motivation and inspiration for Rivera. In 1933, when commissioned for a mural in the RCA building of Rockefeller Center, his mural was never completed because he included a portrait of Lenin and was adamant about not removing it.

Leon Trotsky was a communist leader and Rivera sympathized with him. For this reason, Rivera used his influence over Mexican President Lázaro Cárdenas to get permission for Trotsky and his wife to enter the country. Husband and wife stayed, rent-free, at the Coyoacán house before they moved to a place of their own down the road. However, several political and personal problems developed between Rivera and Trotsky before they broke apart when Trotsky announced that he no longer felt “moral solidarity” with Rivera’s ideas.

He was expelled from the Mexican Communist party in 1929 for unknown reasons and after several re-applications to rejoin, he was re-admitted in September of 1954.

Rockefeller Controversy

 

 

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